Loopity-loop at Loop Head

The weather forecast said little or no rain, yeah right! snigger-snigger, so we packed our nibbles and headed off to the Loop Head Peninsula. From Doolin it is about two to three Angels Travelling hours, because we took the Wild Atlantic Way, where we stopped at quite a few peaceful and beautiful spots along the way, did one or two loopity-loops, admired the scenery, dipped our toes in the icy cold water at the Spanish Point…uhm…no, not really…but almost…and last but not least, had a few conversations with the locals…uhm…sheep…The Spanish Point, by the way, does exist. Lots of ships from the Spanish Armada were shipwrecked at this area, many many years ago, and the survivors were later executed…

Apparently there are more sheep in Ireland than people. It must have been lambing season, because there were so many cute and curious little babies everywhere! These black-faced sort are the most common over here. You should see how high they climb up a mountain, or balance on a treacherous stone, and all that just for the juiciest piece of grass…and that’s all they do the whole day…chomp-chomp-chomp…

Loop Head is the most westerly point of Clare County, and if you have very good eyes, you might see America. Hee…heee! Eyes not so good are they?? Well, it is out there yonder. The cliffs are about two hundred metres high, with wonderful views at eye level, but someone wanted photos of the sea and ‘do-not-dare-go-near-the-edge’ coast below. Granted, the photos are all incredible, as you can see above, so having shaking nervous rattling knees was all worth it…Eeeeek!

The lighthouse is loved by tourists, and one can climb up to the balcony and admire the all-round view. It costs a few euros though. We opted to walk around, and even had a little picnic sitting on the soft grass and appreciating the shimmering ocean, and the fact that it was warm! It also did NOT rain, and it was not so windy. Perfect weather…considering…

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Ding-a-ling in Doolin and stormy escapades on the Cliffs of Moher

Doolin is a lovely small sea-side village on the Atlantic Coast, which is surrounded by the Burren limestone landscape, and not far from the Cliffs of Moher. This little village is where we started our Ireland road trip, with blistering winds and heavy rains. Our charming B&B was practically next door to a well-known pub, which hosted traditional Irish musicians every night. Of course we spent our evenings there…wining-dining-singing! Let’s not mention dancing, because a certain somebody decided that the “let’s-twist-again” goes well with harp strings and bodhráns, so impressed with a very low get-down-boogie, and promptly landed on her bum. The wake-waka did not stop though. Okay, she was in a dark corner…maybe…


After a very hearty breakfast, full Irish of course, (refused to eat the beans for obvious reasons) we drove down to the harbour, where these photos were taken.

In the upper right corner is the Doonagore Castle, a private residence, on a hillside about a half hour’s walk to the Cliffs of Moher, and below is O’Brien’s Tower, situated directly on the Cliffs.

The incredible cliffs, as seen from all angles. They are only 203 metres high, and they look so peaceful over here, BUT…while we were there, it rained almost every ten minutes, then the sun shone and you had to take off one or two layers of clothing, then just as quick you had to put it back on, plus some more. At some areas gale force winds almost lifted us off the ground! If I was skinny, it would have been Adios, Goodbye, there goes Bonnie over the ocean…Oh, and the best was being pelted with flying stones. There is absolutely nowhere you can take cover either!

Amazing arches. Amazing too how these photos were taken! The adventurous dare-devil one with the camera was teetering on the edge, with a very nervous acrophobic digging in her heels and grasping his belt-straps! Phew!
Hag’s Head…the end part of the cliffs, which is a good 11km walk there and back…Many give up halfway, but nooooo, not us, even though we had to walk, crawl, crouch, and most times, fly, (weather conditions applied here) but we did it! Would’ve liked to have seen a hag though…

mohair1See!!!! This is how you look when you reach Hag’s Head! No wonder they call it that.