Rock hopping in the Burren

After three days of cliffs, whiffs and singing Irishmen, we set out on the next leg of our road-trip, to Enniscrone. We will try to get there before midnight, wink-wink…not an easy feat though, because there is so much to see on the way. It was such a lovely time so far, and we managed to stay on the left side of the road, even gave way to a sheep or two…

The Burren, what an amazing rocky landscape! This area really brings out the child in you. It was such fun hopping from rock to rock, scrambling up or down, thereby trying not to fall into a crevice. We could have done this the whole day!!! All the above photos were taken at the famous headland called Black Head. “Some-one” translated it this way, because the Irish name actually means Burren Head…apparently…

This Dolmen is also in the Burren, and is called the Poulnabrone, which “some-one” again, apparently, “wrongly” translated as the “Hole of Sorrows”. The translation seems to have stuck though…We must also add that there are much nicer and more interesting Dolmens than this one…but this one is in all the travel books, go figure… 

And just in case you think that nothing grows in the Burren, here is proof that there are really pretty flowers to be found. The left are Orchids, and the right are blue Gentians. There’s a famous song in Germany about these…okay, so it’s an OLD famous song… “Ja, ja, so blau, blau, blau blüht der Enzian …” or something like that…No, no, not translating it…ja-ja-ja-ja…tra-la-laaaaaa.

Okay, there are not only sheep in Ireland, hee-haw-hee-haw-hee-haw! Kiss me cutie-pie!

 

After visiting the Dolmen, we ignored the Sat-Nav, and took what we thought would be an interesting road. A few metres and the knees started shaking. Not a good thing if you’re the driver, but try to get a big red car up an ultra-narrow, super curvy and extremely steep road. See left photo…So steep that all you can basically see on your way up is the shiny bonnet of your complaining hire car. Added to that, there are high stone walls or big fat hedges on both sides. So yes, PRAY that there’s no oncoming traffic, not even a sheep, cow or rabbit. After a few expletives, we reached the top, and halleluja! we were rewarded with the the most fantastic views of all the green fields below. There is a God!

After a hearty meal to soothe our shocked nerves, it was all downhill from there, smile. The photo on the left was taken of Bell Harbour, which appeared immediately after we exited a sharp curve. Sea-level at last!!

It took us only nine Angels Travelling hours to get from Doolin to Enniscrone, also driving through the wonderful Connemara. Good timing we would say, seeing as we purposely avoided the three hour direct route on the highway. We would not have had so much fun otherwise, not so? Another thing that has to be said is that driving through the Connemara is definitely recommended for those who are sleepless in Seattle, as there are sheep everywhere. Left, right, front, back, one, two, three, four…ZZZZZ…Määäää…and the little lambs were just too cute! We arrived in Enniscrone just after 8pm, bright-eyed and bushy-tailed (we’re not one of those sleepless people) GOT LOST (even though there’s only one main street, but still) then booked into this marvellous Boutique Accommodation. And the glossy red number parked next to it is ours…but only for three weeks…

Aaaaaaahhhhh! BIG BIG HAPPY SIGH. This was our amazing sunset welcome.

Ding-a-ling in Doolin and stormy escapades on the Cliffs of Moher

Doolin is a lovely small sea-side village on the Atlantic Coast, which is surrounded by the Burren limestone landscape, and not far from the Cliffs of Moher. This little village is where we started our Ireland road trip, with blistering winds and heavy rains. Our charming B&B was practically next door to a well-known pub, which hosted traditional Irish musicians every night. Of course we spent our evenings there…wining-dining-singing! Let’s not mention dancing, because a certain somebody decided that the “let’s-twist-again” goes well with harp strings and bodhráns, so impressed with a very low get-down-boogie, and promptly landed on her bum. The wake-waka did not stop though. Okay, she was in a dark corner…maybe…


After a very hearty breakfast, full Irish of course, (refused to eat the beans for obvious reasons) we drove down to the harbour, where these photos were taken.

In the upper right corner is the Doonagore Castle, a private residence, on a hillside about a half hour’s walk to the Cliffs of Moher, and below is O’Brien’s Tower, situated directly on the Cliffs.

The incredible cliffs, as seen from all angles. They are only 203 metres high, and they look so peaceful over here, BUT…while we were there, it rained almost every ten minutes, then the sun shone and you had to take off one or two layers of clothing, then just as quick you had to put it back on, plus some more. At some areas gale force winds almost lifted us off the ground! If I was skinny, it would have been Adios, Goodbye, there goes Bonnie over the ocean…Oh, and the best was being pelted with flying stones. There is absolutely nowhere you can take cover either!

Amazing arches. Amazing too how these photos were taken! The adventurous dare-devil one with the camera was teetering on the edge, with a very nervous acrophobic digging in her heels and grasping his belt-straps! Phew!
Hag’s Head…the end part of the cliffs, which is a good 11km walk there and back…Many give up halfway, but nooooo, not us, even though we had to walk, crawl, crouch, and most times, fly, (weather conditions applied here) but we did it! Would’ve liked to have seen a hag though…

mohair1See!!!! This is how you look when you reach Hag’s Head! No wonder they call it that.